Tag Archives: finished object

Owls cardigan

Hello everyone and happy Saturday. It’s been a long and busy week and I am very glad that it’s the weekend. Today I can finally share with you my owls cardigan! Cast on here as part of the owls knitalong, I shamelessly missed my May deadline, although not by as long as it may appear as it also took a bit of time for it to be cool enough for me to be able to bear putting it on to photograph. It has been WARM in these parts! Even when it hasn’t been sunny, it has been muggy. But I now have pictures!

The pattern is a jumper, Owls by Kate Davies, but knowing that I wear cardigans a lot more than jumpers I have made it into a cardigan. This was really easy to do following the instructions on converting this pattern to a cardigan which I found on Ravelry. Jenny WIllknitt has kindly shared her guide to “cardiganising” the jumper and taken all the effort away from this adaption, with great results.

I love the colour of this yarn. It is Cascade Eco+ in Pumpkin Spice, purchased from The Knitting Shop.  It is also super soft and i know it will be super warm come the winter.

This jumper is meant to be knit with 2 inches of negative ease to make it quite snug, but I completely missed this and have made it according to my actual measurements. This is fine, as I like big and snuggly jumpers, but something to bear in mind if you prefer your jumpers more fitted. I also added a good bit to the length so that it just covers the top of my bum, which is my ideal cardigan length. This will be a great addition to my autumn wardrobe where it is not quite cool enough to wear a coat but a chunky cardigan thrown over a dress does nicely (the dress here is my Simplicity Amazing Fit 1652, in case you were wondering).

I don’t think you can see in the pictures, but each of the 20 owls have tiny buttons for eyes. I managed to find buttons which blend in nicely with the colour of the yarn, so from a distance you can’t see the individual eyes; I like this, it’s kind of a surprise when you view the owls close up and this subtlety makes the jumper more wearable. I also decided to only add three buttons to the front of the cardigan, and leave the rest open. I have another jumper in which the buttons are placed in this way, and I really like how it looks.

As I’m sure you can tell, I love this jumper! The only thing I would change if I could is that the buttons pull slightly which you can see in the photos. I have the same problem with my Corrine cardigan as well as some shop-bought cardigans.If anyone has any tips to fix this I would be most grateful.

I seem to be knitting up a storm this year, with three knitted garments under my belt already. And there is no time for a rest; I’ve already cast on the Miette cardigan after seeing so many lovely versions around the blogosphere. My autumn wardrobe is going to be bursting with homemade knits :)

What’s on your knitting needles or sewing table at the moment?

Kat xx

Swinging sixties top

Back before Christmas I spotted this wonderful cotton print on CalIco Laine’s Facebook page, and immediately knew that I wanted to use this fabric for my second blogger network make. I love this fabric, the retro print has a sixties vibe and it makes me smile – just the thing to beat the winter blues. Because this is such a busy print, I wanted to pick a simple pattern which allowed the fabric to shine. I had in mind to make a top with a contrast yoke and when I remembered Amy’s lovely top made using New Look 6148, a plan was born.

There are many different pattern variations, but I decided on a simple sleeveless blouse with contrast yoke. This is a nice simple top to make with no fastenings, which is great for those who, like me, avoid zips wherever possible (I was pleased to see from Marie’s recent post that I’m not the only one!). I was a bit concerned that this might make it difficult to take on and off, as my head is rather on the large side (no tittering at the back there!), but I needn’t have worried as the neckline leaves plenty of room. There is a LOT of ease built in to this pattern so I recommend taking a good look at the finished measurements before cutting. I went by the finished bust size, leaving a few inches for maneuver, and I reckon I could have still gone with a size smaller. I graded up a few sizes at the hips which was a good call as any smaller here would have been a problem. I bought two metres of the print fabric and I probably could have got away with at least half a metre less, although I love this fabric so much that I am glad to have some left over.

For the main section of the top there are just three pattern pieces, which means that it comes together pretty quickly, even if like me you decide to French seam everything in sight. I must admit to getting a bit confused by the time I got to the neck binding, as for some reason the binding piece was not large enough to go all the way around the neckline, so at this point I stopped following the pattern and made the rest up as I went along. Thankfully this seems to have worked out! Plan B was to use bias binding from my stash to finish the neck and armholes, but the roll of black that I could have sworn I had was nowhere in sight. Instead I resigned myself to plan C: making my own. Producing handmade bias binding is an easy albeit quite boring exercise but luckily for me there was not too much required on this occasion.

This top is the perfect example of when frosting can also work as cake. It may be a fun and colourful print, but paired with a plain skirt as shown here, or a pair of trousers, this would be absolutely fine to wear to work (in my workplace at least!). Who says you can’t have cake and frosting at the same time??

Although I love this fabric, I think that if (when) I make this top again, I will use material which has more drape such as a cotton lawn, which would make it lighter and more summer appropriate. Also there is a tiny bit of pulling on the side seams around the chest which I realise means that I probably need to do an full bust adjustment. I know, I know, I keep putting it off, but I am determined to conquer the FBA and this will be the year. There we go, I’ve written it down, now i’ve committed! I would love to hear reassuring noises from those who have conquered the FBA, and if anyone has any top tips I would love to hear them. I think it’s the thought of slashing my pattern pieces that scares me the most!

Kat xx